(c) commitments made by a Party to its allies or other countries in treaties, conventions and other appropriate documents. In the Agreement on the Prevention of Nuclear War signed in Washington on 22 June 1973, the United States and the Soviet Union agreed to make the elimination of the risk of nuclear war and the use of nuclear weapons a “policy objective”, to exercise restraint in their relations with each other and with all countries. and to pursue a policy committed to stability and peace. It was seen as a first step towards avoiding the outbreak of nuclear war or military conflict through an attitude of international cooperation. Each Party undertakes to maintain and improve, to the extent it deems necessary, its existing organizational and technical arrangements to protect itself against the accidental or unauthorized use of nuclear weapons. Convinced that the agreement on measures to reduce the risk of nuclear war serves the interests of strengthening international peace and security and does not go against the interests of another country, Kissinger, with the help of British diplomat Thomas Brimelow, presented a counter-proposal that he described as “180 degrees of his initial project”. In short, in more than a year of negotiations, we had transformed the initial Soviet proposal to unconditionally abandon the use of nuclear weapons against each other into a somewhat banal statement that our goal was peace, which also applied to allies and third countries and to reluctant international behavior, including avoiding the use or threat of violence, Rest. [2] In the event of an escalation of nuclear threats or violence by all parties to the agreement and not, the United States and the Soviet Union will meet immediately to try to resolve all problems and avoid nuclear conflict by any means necessary. Everything discussed and agreed in this Agreement does not affect or limit Article 51 of the Charter of the United Nations, the provisions of the Charter of the United Nations that discuss international peace and security, as well as other treaties, arrangements and documents that either party has previously concluded with its allies.

The Parties undertake to take immediate action in the event of an accidental, unauthorized or other inexplicable incident involving a possible explosion of a nuclear weapon that could present a risk of the outbreak of nuclear war. In the event of such an incident, the Contracting Party in which the nuclear weapon is involved shall without delay make all necessary efforts to take the necessary measures to neutralize or destroy that weapon without causing damage. In all cases of nuclear escalation, each interested party has full freedom to alert the UN Security Council together with the UN Secretary-General. As well as all governments involved in the outcome of the negotiations referred to in Article IV. The United States and the Soviet Union agree in principle on the need to reach an agreement in order to limit the fear and risk of nuclear war. Another objective of this agreement is to maintain open relations between the United States, the Soviet Union and their allies. In view of the devastating consequences that a nuclear war would have on humanity as a whole and recognizing that every effort must be made to avoid the risk of such a war, including measures to protect against the accidental or unauthorized use of nuclear weapons, the Parties undertake to notify each other without delay if unidentified objects are detected by missile warning systems in; or, in the case of signs of disruption to those systems or their associated communications facilities, where such incidents could present a risk of triggering a nuclear war between the two countries. . . .

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