One of the most controversial topics of the Potsdam conference was the revision of the German-Soviet-Polish borders and the expulsion of millions of Germans from the disputed territories. In exchange for the territory it lost after the rebalancing of the Soviet-Polish border to the Soviet Union, Poland received much of German territory and began deporting German residents from the territories concerned, as well as other nations that held large German minorities. The Negotiators in Potsdam were well aware of the situation and, although the British and Americans feared that a mass exodus of Germans to Western areas of occupation would destabilize them, they merely stated that “all transfers that take place should be done in an orderly and humane manner” and asked the Poles, Czechs and Hungary to temporarily suspend the additional deportations. The Germans of Czechoslovakia (34% of the population of the territory of the present-day Czech Republic), known as Sudeten Germans, but also Carpathian Germans, were driven out of the Sudetenland, where they were the majority, from the linguistic enclaves in Central Bohemia and Moravia, as well as from the city of Prague. After examining the issue in all its aspects, the three governments recognize that the transfer of the German population or its remaining elements to Poland, Czechoslovakia and Hungary must take place in Germany. They agree that all transmissions that take place should be done in an orderly and humane manner. www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/history/mwh/ir2/yaltaandpotsdamrev1.shtml The Potsdam Conference, held from 17 July to 2 August 1945 near Berlin, was the last of the three major meetings of the Second World War. The conference brought together the President of the Soviet Union, the new US President Harry S. Truman and the British Prime Minister Winston Churchill (replaced on 28 July by his successor Clement Attlee). On 26 July, the Heads of State and Government issued a statement calling for Japan`s “unconditional surrender” and hiding the fact that they had privately agreed to let Japan retain its emperor. For the rest, the conference revolved around post-war Europe. A Council of Foreign Ministers, composed of the Big Three, China and France, was agreed.

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